What You Need to Know about Skincare Fads

Fashion fads, diet fads and beauty fads, let’s face it, most have us have been drawn into several fads during our lifetime. It can be easy to get swept up in the hysteria.

A fad is best defined as a short-term craze or a ‘flash in the pan’. It comes and goes quickly and is often replaced when a new fad emerges. It is different to a trend, which is considered as more of a long-term behavioural change.

The skincare industry sees a huge number of fads come and go, driven by several factors:

  • The rise of beauty bloggers & vloggers touting skincare products
  • Products making false or misleading claims
  • Easier access to ingredients and production
  • Lower cost of entry
  • More media channels for a fad to gain traction i.e. social media platforms such as Instagram or misinformation to be spread about faddy treatments and products

The issue with many skincare fads, is they can often leave you out of pocket and falling short of the results you were promised or hoping to achieve.

 

Let’s Look at a Few of the Latest Fads

Online Peels

There has been a rise in the number of masks and peels available online and some sites are now selling chemical peels direct to consumers. Whilst these peels can be extremely beneficial when matched to your skin and performed by a professional, they can be dangerous when purchased online. Some peels can cause irritation or burns, so it is best to only have them done by the experts.

 

Using Horse Medication to Treat Rosacea

This is an alarming fad and has seen people using “horse paste” instead of the approved topical gel Soolantra for treatment of rosacea. The reason for this fad is the horse medication has the same antiparasitic compound as Soolantra and is significantly cheaper. Dermatologists warn again using the unapproved horse medication as it has not been tested on humans and the side effects are unknown.

 AMPERNA Skincare Fads

Applying Apple Cider Vinegar to Your Face

Whilst some natural ingredients are beneficial to the skin, some have no value whilst others can cause problems. In recent years there has been a craze for using apple cider vinegar as part of your skincare routine. The issue is it is a harsh solution that can remove your skins protective layer and cause it to become irritated. Best to keep the apple cider vinegar well away from your skin.

 AMPERNA Skincare Fads

Applying Coconut Oil

Coconut oil contains Lauric and Myristic acids which can make it comedogenic. It does this by causing the cohesion of keratin, making your skins oils attract other substances to them. While this is not always a bad thing, your skin barrier is also made up of ceramides, cholesterol and fatty acids, which the coconut oil can then dilute. As the right balance of these is essential to good skin health, changing this balance with coconut oil may cause your skin to lose hydration and dry out.

Diaper Cream for Perioral Dermatitis

There has been noise about how applying zinc nappy rash cream for perioral dermatitis can be calming to the skin. The issue with this product is it has not been tested for treating this skin condition and has ingredients which can block pores.

If you suffer this condition, the AMPERNA® Probiotic+ DS Soothing Serum has been tested on this skin condition and can help. Read here to find our more: Perioral Dermatitis Prone Skin

 AMPERNA Skincare Fads

Charcoal

Charcoal is used in a number of products from toothpaste to cleansing bars and face masks. The jury is out on these products as scientific studies are yet to prove its effect on the skin.

A huge number of vloggers have been pushing the charcoal face mask, showing their followers videos of them peeling it off and making claims it can remove impurities and make your pores look clearer and smaller. They claim that the charcoal used in the mask can absorb toxins and loads of people are buying into the trend.

The charcoal cleansing bar has also been doing the rounds this year and many beauty bloggers claimed it to be a “miracle acne cure”. It became an instant success on the internet due to the benefits claimed and a great marketing campaign behind the product. The company says the soap is dermatologically proven to prevent break outs and help to balance and brighten skin complexion thanks to ingredients like organic tea tree oil and activated charcoal.

 AMPERNA Skincare Fads

 

Why it is Best to Avoid Skincare Fads

Whilst beauty bloggers would like us to buy into their promises of overnight success, there are no “magic wands” for great skin health or to heal many skin conditions. Buying into these promises will only leave you feeling frustrated and no closer to achieving good skin health.   

How to spot a skincare “fad”?

  • Look out for benefits or claims that are made without any scientific substantiation
  • Be wary of promises that seem too good to be true
  • Read consumer reviews
  • Watch for “buzz” and hysteria being manufactured by advertisers. This can often show up in headlines such as “miracle cure”, “buy now before they run out” or using celebrities to promote the products.

If you suffer from moderate to severe skin conditions such as acne, rosacea and dermatitis, it is always best to seek advice from experts such as dermatologists, pharmacists and doctors. Do your research, read reviews and don’t believe the hype. Instead of seeking quick fixes, the best approach is often a holistic one.

 

The Holistic Approach

As part of your holistic approach to skin care, the AMPERNA® range is suitable for all skin types and has been tested on eczema, perioral dermatitis, rosaceaacne prone skin and more. AMPERNA® is an Australian owned, ethical skincare brand, dedicated to creating revolutionary and unique formulas to help rebalance and transform the appearance of skin. Go to https://amperna.com/ for more information.

 

 

Reference sources:

https://share.upmc.com/2018/03/benefits-charcoal-face-mask/

https://www.womenshealth.com.au/miracle-acne-cure

https://www.biologi.com.au/hype-vs-truth-current-skincare-fads/

https://www.insider.com/beauty-trends-that-arent-good-for-your-skin-2018-8

https://www.laurendamarie.com/laurenda-marie/my-perioral-dermatitis

https://www.insider.com/should-you-put-apple-cider-vinegar-on-your-face-2019-6

 

 

Disclaimer: This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. If symptoms persist, we recommend that you see your GP or dermatologist.


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